The Rescue Shrubs: Six on Saturday, 5-26-18

a large boxwood bush in a wheelbarrow to be transplanted

Shrubs are my obsession this year.  We are looking to create some privacy in our yard.

Always trying to economize, I hunt for discount plants. Free is even better.

The Rescue Boxwood

This beautiful boxwood was thrown into the woods following my neighbor’s landscape renovation.

Today, I couldn’t resist hauling the plant back to my yard and planting it in a front bed.  I wonder if the neighbors will recognize their orphan.

a large boxwood bush in a wheelbarrow to be transplanted
This boxwood is at least a 2-gallon size. It would go for $100+ at the nursery.

 

Dappled Willow

The variegated willow  (Salix integra ‘Hakuro Nishiki’) has become very popular around here.  My shrubs are a bit small, so they are netted until they get bigger.  Like forsythia, deer will eat young plants and new growth, but not year-old growth.

Variegated willow foliage has a silver glow in the part-shade garden.
Salix integra ‘Hakuro Nishiki’ is a great landscape shrub. New growth has a pink tinge in springtime.

 

What Month Is It?

The poinsettia plant is still going strong after six months.  Who knew?!

Red and white poinsettia bloom outdoors in May.
Yes, this lovely is still sporting its vibrant bracts six months later.

Snow-in-summer (Cerastium tomentosum) makes its 2018 debut.  Maybe its show is helping the poinsettia feel at home.

snow-in-summer sends out billowing small, white blooms above fuzzy gray foliage
Cerastium tomentosum looks better than ever, following a vigorous pruning last year.

 

The Chives among Us

Chives send up their cheery pom-poms amid the lady’s mantle.  It’s doing just fine outside of the garden fence.

chives, with purple flowers blooming, grow in a mixed flower border
Chives grow next to the back deck. The rabbits and deer ignore it.

 

Furry Visitors

I’ve been watching my snap pea plants grow in the garden, getting ready to provide some twining support.  Today, I checked on the pea plants and found NOTHING – not a stem, or leaf, or even root anywhere.  There wasn’t even a hole! Could this little guy be the culprit?

Visit The Propagator for more Six on Saturday posts from gardens all over the world!

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9 comments

  1. I’m all for rescue plants..nothing I like better than that challenge! Your Snow in Summer looks lovely.

  2. Nice rescue! It’s always a good idea: give it a try and if you fail, it doesn’t matter!
    About Cerastium tomentosum I should post on Twitter soon, but yours is definitely more floriferous.

  3. Pity about your peas! In the past voles have been the culprits here. Shrubs are so easy ad provide so much. Can’t have too many! That pretty silex may be on my list for when a large one here finally goes over.

  4. Rabbits! What a pain. Can’t you pop out to the local Wal-Mart and pick up an ar-15? (That might be funny if it wasn’t more or less true). I am lucky to have no furry pests, apart from the cats who are prone to use the veg plot as a latrine. At least they don’t eat the veg.

    1. Ha, you are so right! I try not to go to the Wal there unless absolutely necessary (which means, never.) The rabbits are so cute, especially the young’uns. I’ll just have to buy my peas at the market. Oh, darn. Now my parsley is gone, too…

  5. I had a boxwood hedge around my rose garden and another along my terrace, but the japanese boxwood caterpilliar wiped it out. So it is nice to see you nabbed a gorgeous specimin from landing on the heap. Congratulations!!

    1. I hope that I can keep it alive. I’m not familiar with that caterpillar. I hope that is a good omen!

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